FAQs  |  What Are Blood Thinners and How Do They Work?

 

What Are Blood Thinners and How Do They Work?

Kush Desai, MD

Anticoagulants, commonly known as blood thinners, are medications meant to keep your blood from clotting. When a blood clot is found in the deep veins of the leg, it is called a deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Anticoagulants are typically prescribed in these situations to prevent extension of the clot; it is important to remember that it does not actually cause the existing clot to dissolve or break up; the body does that on its own.

Anticoagulants all work differently; some work by changing factors made by the liver, others work directly on proteins in the bloodstream. These medications are delivered in a variety of ways. In the hospital, they may be given through an IV, with a transition to injectable or oral medications later. As an outpatient, they will be initially received orally or through an injection. These medications commonly increase a patient’s ability to bruise and bleed with cuts or trauma. It is important to follow your physician’s advice closely while taking these medications.

 

READ MORE ARTICLES

Genetic DVT Factors 

Read about how genetics can play a role in the development of DVT and what to do if
you might be at risk.

Learn more ›

Why Removing a Blood Clot is Important 

Learn how veins work and what can happen if a blood clot is not properly treated.

Learn more ›

The Risk of Blood Clots During Travel

Why the chance of getting a blood clot increases when you travel and ways to help prevent it.

Learn more ›

TALK TO YOUR DOCTOR



FROM UNDERSTANDING YOUR RISK OF COMPLICATIONS TO FINDING OUT ABOUT YOUR TREATMENT OPTIONS, OUR DOCTOR DISCUSSION GUIDE HAS IMPORTANT QUESTIONS TO ASK YOUR DOCTOR TO HELP CLEAR UP THE CONFUSION ABOUT DVT.

KEEP THE CLARITY COMING WITH EMAIL UPDATES

Top